We arrived at the monument as part of a never ending line of vehicles. The parking lot wound around the base of the site. We found a spot across from the visitor’s center. We waited 10 minutes for a grey haired gent to decide he was ready to leave. Sometimes it is amazing to see people who are so clueless of what others needed.

A hike around the tower allowed us to view the monument from many different angles. It was breathtaking. It could be seen from miles away, a chub of rock rising out of the surrounding forest. Up close the we had a better sense of how massive it was. The cracked rock soared to about 1200 feet. If you looked close you could see climbers as small as ladybugs halfway up, scaling the surface of the wall.
Signs were posted along the path, requesting that we respect this sacred site by staying on the trail. Brightly colored prayer cloths fluttered from branches in the light breeze, God’s to-do list.
There are many stories told about the origin of this monument. Science and myth collide. For more information follow this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Devils_Tower

In the last month the monument has been in the news. Native people want to change the name back to Bear’s Lodge. Others want to keep the Devil’s Tower moniker. The argument reminds us that there is hell to pay when relationships are forged by force, and falsehood.

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